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Patricia Hagen interview

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Patricia Hagen

Monday, December 17, 2012 – 10:00 a.m.

Patricia Hagen’s husband, Rep. Edward Hagen, was arrested on gambling charges Sunday. The detectives asked her to come in for an interview the next day. Detectives Murphy and Parker interviewed her at the Yoknapatawpha County Sheriff’s Department. The interview was recorded with the witness’s knowledge and consent.

Participants:

  • Detective Murphy
  • Detective Parker
  • Patricia Hagen

Detective Parker: I’m Detective Parker. This is Detective Murphy. We’re very glad you were able to chisel some time out of your busy schedule for us.

Detective Murphy: Mrs. Hagen, thank you. I’m sorry to inconvenience you today, but we do have to ask some questions about your husband's involvement with Monica Drum. It shouldn't take too long.

Patricia Hagen: Go ahead. You're the first of many, I'm sure.

Detective Parker: Mrs. Hagen, were you aware that your husband had a serious gambling problem?

Patricia Hagen: I knew he gambled, but I wouldn’t call it a serious problem. He always liked to play cards all his life. He'd get together with the boys and have fun. There are hotels and houses – whole houses – in Washington where the men in Congress get together and play cards, just blow off steam.

Detective Parker: Did you know that Monica Drum was blackmailing your husband with a photograph of him gambling at The Rebel Yell?

Patricia Hagen: No, I did not. And if I had, I would have had that little tramp removed myself.

Detective Murphy: Is that what you did, Mrs. Hagen? Did you arrange for Monica Drum to be killed?

Patricia Hagen: Of course not. Don’t be ridiculous. I never even heard of the woman until all this happened.

Detective Parker: Did you know that your husband had borrowed $10,000 in cash from Oxford developer Frank Knight in order to pay off Monica Drum's demands?

Patricia Hagen: No, I did not. I didn't know anything about that until I read it in the paper this morning. My husband never mentioned the managing editor of the paper. The only one he dealt with was with Craig Pegues, the publisher, when he has to submit a campaign ad or for endorsements and the like. Craig, he’s always nosing around for a dollar.

Detective Murphy: Mrs. Hagen, your husband told Frank Knight that the $10,000 he needed was for his daughter's educational expenses at Ole Miss. Is Audrey still in school?

Patricia Hagen: Yes, she is. And doing just fine, although it would appear that her life, like mine, is now ruined. I've paid for every penny of her educational costs myself with money I saved all my life.

Detective Murphy: Before your husband was elected to Congress, did you and he put your money together in a blind trust?

Patricia Hagen: A what?

Detective Murphy: A blind trust. It’s a managed portfolio of all your assets that neither you nor he could touch while he was serving in the national congress. It's a common practice.

Patricia Hagen: Sounds ridiculous to me. We never did any of that. We have a very good accountant and attorney who takes care of things like investments. I never had to do anything with it. Edward gave me an allowance. No one touched the purse strings except Edward and his men.

Detective Parker: His men? Mrs. Hagen, who are your husband's close friends in the town?

Patricia Hagen: What kind of question is that? He knows just about everybody in this half of the state! How can I narrow it down?

Detective Parker: Would Frank Knight be considered one of his close friends?

Patricia Hagen: Yes. But I couldn't go on naming them all. I won't.

Detective Parker: Do you know who your husband could have hired to kill Ms. Drum, if he was involved with the murder at all?

Patricia Hagen: My husband may have done a lot of things he shouldn’t have, but he did not kill that woman. He simply wouldn’t know anyone who would do that sort of thing.

Detective Parker: You sure?

Patricia Hagen: Of course I’m sure. I’ve known the man for his entire adult life.

Detective Murphy: Yes, Mrs. Hagen. What are your and Audrey’s plans now?

Patricia Hagen: Well, hopefully, we'll get on with our lives, after I get a divorce.

Detective Murphy: You’re divorcing Congressman Hagen?

Patricia Hagen: Do you see me married to a convict, Detective Murphy?

Detective Murphy: No, not really.

Patricia Hagen: I didn't think so. Do you have anything else for me?

Detective Parker: No, ma'am.

Patricia Hagen: Then please call my car. I’m leaving.

Interview ends – 10:14 a.m.

 

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