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The detectives located Wayne Fisher's son, Joel, for an interview
Thursday, February 25, 2016 – 1:00 p.m.

Joel Fisher is the elder son of Wayne Fisher. Detectives Armstrong and Murphy interviewed him at his residence. The interview was recorded with the witness' knowledge and consent.

Participants:

  • Detective T. Armstrong
  • Detective S. Murphy
  • Joel Fisher

Detective Armstrong: Thanks for agreeing to see us today.

Detective Murphy: Our condolences for your loss.

Joel Fisher: How can I help you?

Detective Armstrong: For starters, we'll need your name and address.

Joel Fisher: Joel Jackson Fisher, 2109 Harris Drive.

Detective Murphy: Where do you work?

Joel Fisher: The university library, but just part-time.

Detective Murphy: Are you married?

Joel Fisher: Yes.

Detective Murphy: Do you have children?

Joel Fisher: Yes, my son, Charlie. He's five now.

Detective Armstrong: I understand you're Wayne Fisher's son.

Joel Fisher: Yes.

Detective Armstrong: Did he live here in town?

Joel Fisher: I don't know.

Detective Armstrong: You don't know?

Joel Fisher: No. We didn't speak.

Detective Armstrong: How often did you see him?

Joel Fisher: Never. We didn't keep in touch.

Detective Armstrong: You didn't know where he lived?

Joel Fisher: No. I heard he was here in town, but that's it.

Detective Armstrong: How did you hear that?

Joel Fisher: My mom. She's still in touch with Ned — he's my brother. She said he worked with my father.

Detective Murphy: What's your brother's name?

Joel Fisher: Ned Fisher.

Detective Murphy: Where does he live?

Joel Fisher: I don't know. I guess he was here with my father, but that's just a guess.

Detective Murphy: How often did you see Ned?

Joel Fisher: Never.

Detective Armstrong: Why never?

Joel Fisher: Mom and my father divorced, and Ned and I pretty much took sides. My father was a bastard, but I guess Ned didn't see it that way.

Detective Armstrong: A bastard in what way?

Joel Fisher: He had a criminal record. You have to know that already. He wasn't a nice guy — didn't give a damn about us or Mom.

Detective Armstrong: When was this?

Joel Fisher: Way back. Before high school. They got divorced in… it must have been 1997. I haven't talked with him much since then. He moved out, and I never wanted to see him again.

Detective Armstrong: What about Ned? When was the last time you saw him?

Joel Fisher: I don't know. College, I guess. I would go home, and he'd be there. We didn't get along. He's just like my father — lazy. He took advantage of Mom. She kicked him out ten years ago now, I guess, maybe more. That was it.

Detective Murphy: What's your mother's name?

Joel Fisher: Christine Fisher. Do you have to bother her with this? It'll just upset her.

Detective Murphy: I'm afraid so. Where does she live?

Joel Fisher: Pontotoc. I can give you her number if you want.

Detective Murphy: That'd be helpful, once we're done.

Detective Armstrong: You seem pretty angry at your father and brother.

Joel Fisher: It's something I'm working on. Therapy — my wife, Delia, asked me to do it. But you know what they say — childhood experiences are indelible. I guess I've been mad at my father all my life. I'm just not ready to forgive all that, especially being a dad myself. I would do anything for my son. I can't understand people who don't.

Detective Armstrong: Maybe your father thought what he was doing was best for the family.

Joel Fisher: I doubt that occurred to him.

Detective Armstrong: Why do you say that?

Joel Fisher: I don't know. I'm just guessing. He wasn't around enough for me to know.

Detective Murphy: Mr. Fisher, who is Robert Pruitt?

Joel Fisher: I don't know. Or… isn't he the other guy? I thought I read it in the paper. The other guy who was shot?

Detective Murphy: Did you know him?

Joel Fisher: No.

Detective Murphy: Did Delia know him?

Joel Fisher: No, not that I know of.

Detective Murphy: Why would your father be in Mr. Pruitt's house?

Joel Fisher: I have no idea.

Detective Murphy: Who is Vanessa Pruitt?

Joel Fisher: I don't know. Related to the other dead guy, I guess?

Detective Armstrong: What line of work were your father and brother in?

Joel Fisher: I don't know. I told Mom I didn't want to hear anything about it, and I never saw them here. I'm sorry. I guess I must seem uncooperative, but that's not my intent — honest. I honestly do not know what they were doing. I never wanted to talk to them again.

Detective Armstrong: What were you doing on February 19th, this past Friday?

Joel Fisher: Last Friday? Delia and Charlie went to the street party. I hate that kind of thing, but she loves it and Charlie wanted to go. I did some work at the Arts Council, and then just watched a movie. Pretty quiet.

Detective Armstrong: Was anyone else at the Arts Council?

Joel Fisher: Sure. For a while. A mailing — we were all stuffing envelopes. I stayed later than the rest though. I update the web site and had to get it done.

Detective Armstrong: Did you see your father or brother at any time that day?

Joel Fisher: No.

Detective Armstrong: What were they doing that day?

Joel Fisher: I don't know. No kidding, I haven't seen either of them in ten years or more.

Detective Murphy: Who do you think might have killed your father and Mr. Pruitt?

Joel Fisher: I can only imagine. My father was probably involved with all kinds of scum, but I don't know anyone specific.

Detective Murphy: Is there any way you could put us in touch with your brother, Ned?

Joel Fisher: I'm sorry. For your sake, I wish I knew how to find him, but I don't. I'm going to need to pick up Charlie at school — day ends at 2:00.

Detective Murphy: OK. We may need to speak with you again.

Detective Armstrong: For now, we'll take that number for your mother.

Interview ends – 1:30 p.m.

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