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The detectives asked Joel Fisher to fill in some gaps in his story

Wednesday, March 2, 2016 – 10:12 a.m.

Joel Fisher is the estranged son of victim #2, Wayne Fisher. Detectives Armstrong and Murphy interviewed him at his residence. The interview was recorded with the witness' knowledge and consent.

Participants:

  • Detective T. Armstrong
  • Detective S. Murphy
  • Joel Fisher

Detective Armstrong: Thanks for seeing us again.

Joel Fisher: Let's get this over with.

Detective Murphy: OK. Name and address, for the record?

Joel Fisher: Joel Jackson Fisher, 2109 Harris Drive.

Detective Armstrong: Thanks, Mr. Fisher.

Detective Murphy: Where's your son this morning?

Joel Fisher: He's with Jack — our neighbors. But I don't understand. I told you everything there is to say.

Detective Armstrong: Well then, let's go over it again. You say you didn't know your father and brother were in town. How did you find out?

Joel Fisher: Delia told me. My wife, Delia, she works at the bank. She knows everyone in town. I guess they have an account there.

Detective Murphy: It was your wife?

Joel Fisher: Yeah.

Detective Murphy: Last time you said it was your mother.

Joel Fisher: What? Oh. Right. Honestly, I don't remember. Mom said they were in town. Maybe Delia found out they were working together. I don't know, and frankly, I didn't care. Scum — they were both scum. Ned still is, I guess.

Detective Armstrong: Had you had any contact with either of them lately?

Joel Fisher: No.

Detective Armstrong: Some kind of encounter that made you angry?

Joel Fisher: No. Look, I don't know what you're getting at, but I sure as hell had nothing to do with this. I'm a dad. I would never do anything to put Charlie in danger. I can't conceive of it.

Detective Armstrong: What do you mean "put Charlie in danger"?

Joel Fisher: I want to keep him away from people like that as much as possible — not risk exposure. Mom thought different. She thought I should try to reestablish contact. But no way. Charlie — everything I do now is for Charlie, and having them around would be no good at all.

Detective Armstrong: Well, Mr. Fisher, we have a problem.

Joel Fisher: What do you mean?

Detective Armstrong: We can't really pin down where you were when the murder occurred.

Joel Fisher: I told you. I was at the Arts Council, then I watched a movie while Delia and Charlie were at the Rib Cage Street Party.

Detective Murphy: Which movie was that?

Joel Fisher:Furious 7. It was on HBO, and I wanted to watch it while Charlie was gone. I think he's too young to see it. Look, what does this have to do with anything?

Detective Murphy: And you went right home from the Arts Council? You didn't stop anywhere?

Joel Fisher: No, I just went home.

Detective Murphy: You're sure about that?

Joel Fisher: Yes, of course. I left the Arts Council, and I— oh.

Detective Murphy: "Oh"?

Joel Fisher: I stopped and got a sandwich at Newk's on the way home. Does that matter?

Detective Armstrong: Well, people saw you at the Arts Council, a neighbor saw your car, but we can't guarantee you were at home.

Detective Murphy: You didn't call anyone that night?

Joel Fisher: No. Look — this is crazy. I don't like Ned and my father but killing them? I would never have anything to do with that. The house — I've never even been to that place where you found him and that other guy. What's his name? Pruitt. I've never heard of him.

Detective Murphy: Then why did Ned suggest we talk to you about your father's killing?

Joel Fisher: Why do you think?

Detective Armstrong: Enlighten us.

Joel Fisher: It's just the kind of thing Ned would say. Scum — he's total scum. Don't trust a word that comes out of his mouth.

Detective Murphy: What can you tell us about Fisher Pest Control?

Joel Fisher: Nothing.

Detective Murphy: Were they doing OK for money?

Joel Fisher: I have no idea.

Detective Armstrong: I thought you said your wife worked at the bank.

Detective Murphy: Did she tell you about the Fisher Pest Control account?

Joel Fisher: No, never. She keeps everything confidential. I mean, she might've told me they had an account, but no way would she disclose the details about money. It's a relationship of trust — like a doctor. No way would she go around blabbing the details of everyone who took out a loan or bounced a check. It'd be unprofessional.

Detective Armstrong: OK, OK. We get it.

Detective Murphy: Back to Fisher Pest Control — what else can you tell us?

Joel Fisher: What do you mean, what else? I haven't told you anything because I don't know anything. The name is Fisher Pest Control. My father and my brother run it — that's it. That's all I know.

Detective Murphy: You never used their services?

Joel Fisher: Are you crazy? I wouldn't trust them in my home. It's probably some kind of cover operation anyway. Those vans were probably full of smuggled liquor and cigarettes. I'm just guessing, you know, based on past experience. Disgusting — you can see why I never wanted to have anything to do with them again.

Detective Armstrong: Did you want that enough to kill your father?

Joel Fisher: What? No.

Detective Armstrong: Did you see Wayne or Ned the day of February 19th?

Joel Fisher: No.

Detective Murphy: Did you commit these crimes, Mr. Fisher?

Joel Fisher: No.

Detective Murphy: What would you say if later it was proved that you did this?

Joel Fisher: No — that's impossible. You could never prove that because I didn't do it.

Detective Armstrong: What about your mother?

Joel Fisher: What?

Detective Armstrong: Do you think she killed them?

Joel Fisher: No way. Now you're really being foolish. She's a sweet woman who never hurt anyone. They treated her like trash — took advantage of her, took her money and never lifted a finger to help her. I can't believe you're accusing her — accusing either of us, for that matter. As far as I'm concerned, they were already dead to me. Why would I bother hunting them down?

Detective Armstrong: You mean, aside from all that anger?

Detective Murphy: You're in therapy for it.

Joel Fisher: Look, that's between me and Delia. She wanted me to do it — she was concerned for my health. It doesn't mean anything. There's a stigma attached to therapy, and it's just ridiculous. You're ridiculous. These questions — I can't believe what you're asking.

Detective Murphy: Mr. Fisher, do you own a gun?

Joel Fisher: Absolutely not!

Detective Armstrong: Not even a rifle or shotgun for hunting? A hand-me-down from a relative? Anything like that?

Joel Fisher: No. No way. I have a young son. There's no way we'd have a gun in the house for any reason.

Detective Murphy: Did your father have any guns?

Joel Fisher: I wouldn't be surprised.

Detective Murphy: What about your brother?

Joel Fisher: Again, it wouldn't surprise me if he did. But as I said, I have no contact with them. I don't know what they do, what they own. I don't know anything about their lives. You should be asking Ned these questions. He's the one who'd know.

Detective Armstrong: How would you feel if we needed to talk with you again?

Joel Fisher: Honestly, I'd want to have a lawyer with me. I can't believe some of the accusations you're coming up with. Outrageous — it's completely unthinkable. You know, I'd rather stop right now. I'm not trying to be uncooperative. I just have to think of my son. I have to protect myself for him. He can't grow up alone.

Detective Murphy: OK, Mr. Fisher.

Detective Armstrong: We'll be in touch.

Interview ends – 10:51 a.m.

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